Supported ESP Chips

ESPEasy does support a number of variants of the processors manufactured by Espressif.

  • ESP8266 The original ESP processor, with external flash.

  • ESP8285 Mainly found in “Chinese” products. Has flash built in the processor. (almost always 1MByte flash)

  • ESP32 The first successor of the ESP82xx, supporting 2 CPU cores, Bluetooth and more RAM and more GPIO pins. (and other new features)

  • ESP32-S2 Has more GPIO pins than the ESP32, but only 1 CPU core. Initial support in ESPEasy added since 2021-09-19.

  • ESP32-S3 Not yet available to buy. (as of September 2021)

  • ESP32-C3 Support in ESPeasy will be added soon.

Espressif platforms

ESP8266

ESP32

ESP32-S2

release Year

2014

2016

2019

Microcontroller

Xtensa single-core 32-bit L106

Xtensa single/dual-core 32-bit LX6

Xtensa single-core 32-bit LX7

Clock Frequency

80 MHz

160/240 MHz

240 MHz

Co-processor

No

ULP

ULP (RISC-V)

SRAM

160 KB

520 KB

320 KB

ROM

No

448 KB

128 KB

RTC Memory

No

16 KB

16 KB

External SPIRAM

No

Up to 16MB

Up to 128MB

External Flash

Up to 16MB

Up to 16MB

Up to 1GB

Wi-Fi (802.11 b/g/n)

HT20

HT20

HT20

ESP-MESH

Yes

Yes

Yes

Bluetooth

No

BT 4.2 BR/EDR & BLE

No

Ethernet

No

10/100 Mbps

No

CAN

No

2.0

No

Time of Flight

No

No

Yes

GPIO (total)

16

34

43

Touch Sensors

No

10

14

SPI

2

4

4 (OSPI)

I2C

1 (soft)

2

2

I2S

2

2

1

UART

2 (1 ½ actually)

3

2

ADC

1 (10-bit)

18 (12-bit)

20 (12-bit)

DAC

No

2 (8-bit)

2 (8-bit)

PWM (soft)

8

16

8

SDMMC

No

Yes

No

RMT (remote control)

No

Yes

Yes

USB OTG

No

No

Yes

LCD Interface

No

No

Yes

Camera Interface

No

No

Yes

Temperature sensor

No

Yes

Yes

Hall sensor

No

Yes

No

Security

No

Secure boot Flash encryption 1024-bit OTP

Secure boot Flash encryption 4096-bit OTP

Crypto

No

AES, SHA-2, RSA, ECC, RNG

AES-128/192/256, SHA-2, RSA, RNG, HMAC, Digital Signature

Low Power Consumption

20uA

10uA deep sleep

Automatic RF power management 5uA in idle mode 24uA at 1% duty cycle

Table content source

ESP8266/ESP8285

The ESP8266 was the “original” ESP platform and was found in the original Sonoff Basic modules. The ESP8266 does need an external SPI flash module to store its progam data and configuration.

Later a (probably) less expensive ESP8285 appeared, which does have the SPI flash integrated in the chip. This means you cannot upgrade it by soldering a larger flash chip on it. It does however free up 2 GPIO pins, which were previously unavailable as they were used to access the SPI flash. For some products like the Sonoff 4ch modules this chip was a must-have.

The small 1MB flash does impose some issues when trying to perform an “OTA” update of the firmware as there is not enough space to store the active firmware and the new version at the same time. For 1MB modules (some ESP8266 modules were also sold with 1MB flash, like the ESP-01 modules) you need to take some extra steps to perform an OTA update. Otherwise the only way to upgrade to a newer build is by flashing using the serial port.

ESP32

The most important new features of the ESP32, compared to ESP82xx are:

  • Dual core CPU @ 240 MHz

  • Upto 320 kByte of RAM

  • 3 Hardware serial ports

  • Bluetooth (not supported yet in ESPEasy)

  • Extra GPIO pins

  • Upto 18 GPIO pins can operate as ADC.

  • Upto 10 touch pins

  • Support for Ethernet

ESP32-S2

Note

Support for the ESP32-S2 is very preliminary, as in it is hardly tested (as of September 2021)

The ESP32-S2 is a bit strange when looking at its features and taking into account it was introduced about 3 years after the ESP32.

The ESP32-S2 is missing quite a lot of useful features its predecessor had:

  • No Bluetooth

  • Single core

  • No support for Ethernet

  • No support for CAN

  • 2 Harware Serial ports.

  • Less RAM

The only advantages of the ESP32-S2 compared to its predecessor are:

  • More GPIO pins

  • 2 extra ADC capable pins

  • 4 extra touch capable pins

  • USB OTG (not yet supported in ESPEasy)

  • LCD interface (not yet supported in ESPEasy)

  • Camera interface (not yet supported in ESPEasy)

  • Extra hardware accelerated encryption functions (not yet supported in ESPEasy)

  • Supposedly lower power consumption (not yet verified)

  • Time of Flight (TOF) support that would (theoretically) allow indoor positioning